How far can you go?

The following picture is a one of a kind. How often do you see tombstones being sold next to the apples and melons?

The moment a camera was placed in my hands for a viewfinder to capture beautiful images, destiny made its path for me. My obsession with cameras was not clear until I placed the facts on a sheet of paper. Purchasing 7 video/photo cameras in a year (broken or not) seemed somewhat irrational. Experimenting with different lenses, brands and anything unusual leaked into a much bigger pool than just a hobby.

On an underground Russian market, bordering the Tallinn (Estonian capital) railway station, an interesting looking camera attracted my eyes. The camera looked antique, but still in excellent condition. After buying the camera, wrapped in an interesting looking case, a short research was necessary. Turns out this is a Lomo, of which it is one first of the Smena models (1953) from the USSR. The camera was designed to produce 8mm film, but the 35mm fits inside as well. Only in order to use modern film, an empty film role case must be placed up-side-down inside the camera, for the film to flow from the original case into this empty role. After capturing all the images, the film must manually be rolled back into its original case. Of course without any light being able to damage the film. After some experimentation the film was developed and the outcome is extraordinary!

The images shown below are taken of the Smena in a photo studio. The photos that this 60 year old model took will be presented very soon!

This is something exquisite rapped into something beautiful. The case fits perfectly around the camera

The camera with the case open. With the screw underneath the two are stuck together. It is easy to take a photo with the case open, which is what modern cameras miss nowadays.

Here she is without her dress

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USSR Cold War Submarine De-magnetization Station

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Estonia, Along the deserted North-Estonian coastline a dock lays, of which its history will remain obscure to anyone that travels past it, unless a local told its tail. The peculiar lump of cement stranded in the water belonged to the Russian military during the cold war.

“Why then would this station be so special in comparison to the 1600 other Russian military bases along the Estonian waterfront?”

The answer to that was ironically kept secret at the time of use, as it helped conceal monstrous machines that all the world’s generals feared to be attacked by any time, anywhere. Just like every other ruthless killer, she lurks its prey and strikes when least expected.

Under the sea level a submarine de-magnetization station was built. One of the only ways for a radar to signal a submarine is via the earths electromagnetic field, and so when travelling from different parts of the world it is easy for the enemy to pinpoint where this massive scrap of metal is floating. The submarine would rest here inside a massive coil that would charge a high voltage neutralize the ship and thus to no longer be traceable amongst these poles of the earth.

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